Alice Maynard on the things that help her maintain her independence.

Head and shoulders picture of Alice

Dr Alice Maynard CBE is an experienced Non-Executive Director having worked since the early ‘90s as a Trustee of several Charities and a member of two Housing Association Committees.
Alice was Chair of Scope for 6 years, a £100m turnover charity providing services to disabled people with high support needs and campaigning for disabled people’s equality.
Alice is a Chartered Director (Institute of Directors) and has worked in the private, public and third sectors and she has established two successful businesses of her own (Equal Ability and Future Inclusion).
Alice has spinal muscular atrophy and uses a powered wheelchair to get around. She lives in Milton Keynes.

Here are the links to the products and services Alice mentioned:-

If you would like to appear on our podcast Gear, Gadgets and Gizmos please contact Chris Lofthouse. His email is chrislofthouse@RiDC.org.uk or call 0207 427 2467

The Phil & Simon Show No 34 with Caroline Casey

Valuable 500, growing up blind, disability, business, campaigningCaroline Casey is an engaging and emotive speaker. She’s done a TED Talk, spoken at Davos and her current project is to get 500 global companies to sign a pledge to discuss disability in the boardroom. 
We start by exploring her remarkable childhood, where her parents didn’t tell her that she had sight loss. She explains how the Johnny Cash song, ‘A Boy Named Sue’ influenced this thinking. 

Having a great memory and the ability to listen, meant Caroline not only got by but got on. Then as a young adult, as she was about to have a driving lesson, she realised something was amiss. A later attempt to learn to drive stopped abruptly when she not only couldn’t she read the number plate, she couldn’t identify the car.  
After the realisation, rather than explore this identity, she decided to hide it herself and spent a further 11 years pretending nothing was different, a period she calls ‘the fraudulent years’. When applying for a job and asked to complete a monitoring form she’d hesitate and eventually lightly graze the tick box, in pencil, showing her confusion. 
Finally, at 28 years old, she says she ‘came out of the disability closet’ and embraced her full self although acknowledges, she’s still working on accepting it – asking for help is one of the toughest things for her to do and she sees this inability as a weakness.
Her latest campaign is Valuable 500 and she gives us an update with an impending deadline. If 56% of board meeting agendas have never mentioned disability, 7% of board-level employees have an impairment and 80% of those hide the fact, there’s some work to do.
There are a few mild swear words, just to let you know. Transcription is available on request. 
Links 


After the realisation, rather than explore this identity, she decided to hide it herself and spent a further 11 years pretending nothing was different, a period she calls ‘the fraudulent years’. When applying for a job and asked to complete a monitoring form she’d hesitate and eventually lightly graze the tick box, in pencil, showing her confusion. 
Finally, at 28 years old, she says she ‘came out of the disability closet’ and embraced her full self although acknowledges, she’s still working on accepting it – asking for help is one of the toughest things for her to do and she sees this inability as a weakness.
Her latest campaign is Valuable 500 and she gives us an update with an impending deadline. If 56% of board meeting agendas have never mentioned disability, 7% of board-level employees have an impairment and 80% of those hide the fact, there’s some work to do.
There are a few mild swear words, just to let you know. Transcription is available on request. 
Links 

https://www.thevaluable500.com
Diversish video
A Boy Named Sue
Twitter @500Valuable

Have Spoon Will Travel

Born in 1960, Rosie’s impairment is four-limbed Phocomelia caused by the drug Thalidomide.

After graduating with a BSc., (Hons) Degree in Psychology through Cardiff University in 1985, Rosie joined the Civil Service and remained with the Department of Trade and Industry at Companies House Cardiff until 1993 at Executive Officer level.

In 1995 Rosie formed the RMS Disability Issues Consultancy, out of a genuine desire to deliver first-class training in the field of Disability Equality and Disability Issues.

Rosie received an OBE in the Queen’s New Years Honours List in 2015, “For Services to the Equality and the Rights of Disabled People.”

Rosie was awarded an Honorary Fellowship from Cardiff University in 2017.

Married, with one son, Rosie has a particular interest in radio, television and the arts.  Rosie has been the subject of several documentaries. She has worked with the BBC, Sky and ITV, and can be heard regularly on BBC Radio Wales.  She is a freelance TV and Radio Presenter.

Links:

Spoon and fork holder with a magnet

Single use flexible straws

Folding shelf for eating in restaurants

Fork holder with a magnet, use cheap cutlery

Mount n mover https://www.mountnmover.com/

It’s all about finding your way around says R​ick Williams

Rick Williams runs his own business based in Brighton. The company have been around for about 20 years and supply consultancy and training services to organisations that want to improve their employment and services provided for disabled people.

Rick went blind in his mid-40s as a result of retinitis pigmentosa and this explains his lifelong commitment and passion for ensuring that disabled people, particularly those with sight impairments, lead as independent and inclusive a life as possible.

In this edition of Gear, Gadgets and Gizmos Rick discusses a variety of things which enable him to have a very full and active life.

Freeney Williams http://www.freeneywilliams.com

iPhone and Ipad has a Text to Speech Function

Free Navigation support https://www.bemyeyes.com/

Jaws Screen Reader http://bit.ly/2DEWztk

Apple Vis https://www.applevis.com/

Talking Microwave http://bit.ly/2DB3K5x

Tactile Measuring Jug https://amzn.to/2DF77st

Dymo Tape http://bit.ly/2DDBfEw

Geoff Adams-Spink talks about his favourite gadgets

Hello everyone and welcome to this the inaugural edition of the Gear, Gadgets and Gizmos podcast. 

We’re delighted to welcome as our first guest Geoff Adams-Spink one of the trustees of Research Institute for Disabled Consumers (RiDC).

Geoff was born with multiple impairments as a result of thalidomide. He has  shortened upper limbs, a missing right eye and extremely restricted vision in his left eye. 

He left the BBC in 2011 to set up his own disability equality consultancy and to Chair an international federation of organisations for those affected by congenital limb difference (EDRIC). 

As a trainer and public speaker, he has worked extensively in the UK, many EU countries, Ukraine, China and Thailand. 

He has an outward-looking world view and seeks to help international business, public and third sector organisations to learn from each other by spreading best practice in the field of disability equality. 

In my conversation with Geoff he talks about the things that he uses to overcome the difficulties that his impairments put in his way. Some are simple devices others more complex but all provide a solution.

I’ve posted below links to the products and services that Geoff mentioned.

Don’t forget to take a look at the RateIt website hosted by the Research Institute for Disabled Consumers where you will find a whole host of products and gadgets which might be useful to you. https://rateit.ridc.org.uk/

Finally, if you are a disabled person and would like to join the RIDC Consumer Panel please email Chris Lofthouse at chrislofthouse@ridc.org.uk or call 020 7427 2467

Links:

Clamp for tablet Bestek https://amzn.to/2VBrDBa  £22 approx 

Amazon Echo Smart Speaker https://amzn.to/2VDfGLj 

Aquarius Portabidet http://bit.ly/2VBY5Dn 

Closemat http://bit.ly/2VFgE9Y 

Gerberit  http://bit.ly/2VCH243 

Disabled Facilities Grant from Local Authority http://bit.ly/2VDj48Z 

The Generation Game

The Generation Game

How often do you hear, ‘what do the young people want?’ Perhaps not often enough. Certainly not as often as ‘how things have changed since my day!’ 

We wanted to hear from the next generation so we invited the multi-talented Abbi Brown on to our show. She works for the ad agency behind the now famous Malteser adverts on Channel 4.

With Abbi we explore whether you can make more of a difference from the inside or outside, who her (disabled) role models were when she was growing up and does she think there’s a disability movement these days. Indeed, what is activism these days, what are the next generation ‘fighting for’ if anything and does social media help or hinder? We also talk about using the bus and not thinking twice about it. 

Abbi has personal experience of disability with OI (brittle bones) deafness and mental health problems. 

You can follow Abbi on 

Twitter @AbbiSigns 

Instagram abbisigns  

YouTube  Ithinkmynameismoose

RADAR searches for leaders of the future

A disability organisation is looking for 100 ambitious disabled people to help become future leaders in the public, private and charity sectors.

RADAR’s new leadership programme will bring together aspiring disabled leaders and provide them with the skills and personal development training they need.

Government figures show that only one in 20 appointees to the boards of the UK’s 1,200 public bodies are disabled or have a long-term health condition.

The government aims to increase this to nearly one in seven new appointments (14 per cent) by March 2011.

RADAR secured funding over three years for the new programme from the Department for Communities and Local Government, following its previous leadership work with the Equality and Human Rights Commission and the Disability Rights Commission.

David Stocks, RADAR’s empowerment manager, who is a graduate of one of its previous leadership schemes, said it was “of the utmost importance” to “help disabled people realise their potential as leaders”.

He said: “Disabled people are not getting enough input into the way the country is run and their voice is not being heard.

“It is time to tap into the great pool of talent that is waiting to be realised within those living with ill-health, injury or disability.”

RADAR is particularly looking for applications from disabled people from black and minority ethnic backgrounds, and those with learning difficulties, neuro-diversity conditions and mental health conditions, as all four groups are particularly under-represented in leadership positions.

A senior civil servant from the Office for Disability Issues will mentor those in each of the four groups.

All 100 successful applicants will be invited to four leadership development days between January and April 2010 in Manchester and Birmingham, with coaching, mentoring and workshops, and additional telephone support between the four events.

To find out more, visit:www.radar.org.uk/leadership/downloads.aspx

The closing date for applications is Monday, 7 December.

News provided by John Pring atjpringnews@googlemail.com