The Phil & Simon Show No 35

Our summer holidays are over and we review our respective trips.

Gran Canaria, Brussels, Berlin, Twinwood Festival 2019 and a trip around the UK all get a mention.

A rarely seen public refusal, Dominos Pizza is asking the US Supreme Court to allow them to ignore the needs of sight-impaired people regarding the accessibility of their website, all because they say they don’t have any guidelines.

Another refusal comes from the Royal and Ancient Golf Club who banned an Open Champion, John Daly from using a golf buggy because it would ‘break with tradition’.

One person who managed to get the rules changed in his favour is Billy Monger. After becoming disabled from a racing car crash, he is back in Formula 3 racing having had the regulations excluding disabled drivers racing revised to include him and others.

We wrap up with some comments from our listeners and a sort of book review “The Longevity Economy by Joseph F. Coughlin” which suggest we need to view ageing and disability differently.

Links: 

Twinwood Festival 2019

Domino Pizza Supreme Court story http://bit.ly/2UZmvak   Note – there is a strong swear word in the headline.

John Daly Golf Cart story http://bit.ly/2NmZWvo

Billy Monger http://bit.ly/2V534x8

The Longevity Economy by Joseph Coughlin https://amzn.to/2V2C5SU

Click here for the Itunes link https://apple.co/2AvKoe8 or here http://bit.ly/331gEEy for the Audioboom version  If you have any comments, feedback or suggestions, please email us at philandsimonshow@gmail.com. We hope you enjoy it.

You can visit the Phil and Simon Show Facebook page http://bit.ly/1t8tS0d or follow us on Twitter @PhilSimonShow

The Phil & Simon Show No 34 with Caroline Casey

 

Valuable 500, growing up blind, disability, business, campaigningCaroline Casey is an engaging and emotive speaker. She’s done a TED Talk, spoken at Davos and her current project is to get 500 global companies to sign a pledge to discuss disability in the boardroom. 
We start by exploring her remarkable childhood, where her parents didn’t tell her that she had sight loss. She explains how the Johnny Cash song, ‘A Boy Named Sue’ influenced this thinking. 

Having a great memory and the ability to listen, meant Caroline not only got by but got on. Then as a young adult, as she was about to have a driving lesson, she realised something was amiss. A later attempt to learn to drive stopped abruptly when she not only couldn’t she read the number plate, she couldn’t identify the car.  
After the realisation, rather than explore this identity, she decided to hide it herself and spent a further 11 years pretending nothing was different, a period she calls ‘the fraudulent years’. When applying for a job and asked to complete a monitoring form she’d hesitate and eventually lightly graze the tick box, in pencil, showing her confusion. 
Finally, at 28 years old, she says she ‘came out of the disability closet’ and embraced her full self although acknowledges, she’s still working on accepting it – asking for help is one of the toughest things for her to do and she sees this inability as a weakness.
Her latest campaign is Valuable 500 and she gives us an update with an impending deadline. If 56% of board meeting agendas have never mentioned disability, 7% of board-level employees have an impairment and 80% of those hide the fact, there’s some work to do.
There are a few mild swear words, just to let you know. Transcription is available on request. 
Links 


After the realisation, rather than explore this identity, she decided to hide it herself and spent a further 11 years pretending nothing was different, a period she calls ‘the fraudulent years’. When applying for a job and asked to complete a monitoring form she’d hesitate and eventually lightly graze the tick box, in pencil, showing her confusion. 
Finally, at 28 years old, she says she ‘came out of the disability closet’ and embraced her full self although acknowledges, she’s still working on accepting it – asking for help is one of the toughest things for her to do and she sees this inability as a weakness.
Her latest campaign is Valuable 500 and she gives us an update with an impending deadline. If 56% of board meeting agendas have never mentioned disability, 7% of board-level employees have an impairment and 80% of those hide the fact, there’s some work to do.
There are a few mild swear words, just to let you know. Transcription is available on request. 
Links 

https://www.thevaluable500.com
Diversish video
A Boy Named Sue
Twitter @500Valuable