The Phil & Simon Show No 34 with Caroline Casey

Valuable 500, growing up blind, disability, business, campaigningCaroline Casey is an engaging and emotive speaker. She’s done a TED Talk, spoken at Davos and her current project is to get 500 global companies to sign a pledge to discuss disability in the boardroom. 
We start by exploring her remarkable childhood, where her parents didn’t tell her that she had sight loss. She explains how the Johnny Cash song, ‘A Boy Named Sue’ influenced this thinking. 

Having a great memory and the ability to listen, meant Caroline not only got by but got on. Then as a young adult, as she was about to have a driving lesson, she realised something was amiss. A later attempt to learn to drive stopped abruptly when she not only couldn’t she read the number plate, she couldn’t identify the car.  
After the realisation, rather than explore this identity, she decided to hide it herself and spent a further 11 years pretending nothing was different, a period she calls ‘the fraudulent years’. When applying for a job and asked to complete a monitoring form she’d hesitate and eventually lightly graze the tick box, in pencil, showing her confusion. 
Finally, at 28 years old, she says she ‘came out of the disability closet’ and embraced her full self although acknowledges, she’s still working on accepting it – asking for help is one of the toughest things for her to do and she sees this inability as a weakness.
Her latest campaign is Valuable 500 and she gives us an update with an impending deadline. If 56% of board meeting agendas have never mentioned disability, 7% of board-level employees have an impairment and 80% of those hide the fact, there’s some work to do.
There are a few mild swear words, just to let you know. Transcription is available on request. 
Links 


After the realisation, rather than explore this identity, she decided to hide it herself and spent a further 11 years pretending nothing was different, a period she calls ‘the fraudulent years’. When applying for a job and asked to complete a monitoring form she’d hesitate and eventually lightly graze the tick box, in pencil, showing her confusion. 
Finally, at 28 years old, she says she ‘came out of the disability closet’ and embraced her full self although acknowledges, she’s still working on accepting it – asking for help is one of the toughest things for her to do and she sees this inability as a weakness.
Her latest campaign is Valuable 500 and she gives us an update with an impending deadline. If 56% of board meeting agendas have never mentioned disability, 7% of board-level employees have an impairment and 80% of those hide the fact, there’s some work to do.
There are a few mild swear words, just to let you know. Transcription is available on request. 
Links 

https://www.thevaluable500.com
Diversish video
A Boy Named Sue
Twitter @500Valuable

The Phil & Simon Show No 30 – AI and Recruitment

We kick off this show with a discussion about the future of work and the increasing use of artificial intelligence in recruitment. Liz Sayce and Jane Hatton discussed some of the possible repercussions for disabled people at a joint presentation they gave to the Royal Society of Arts. http://bit.ly/2VHxiWq

Simon reflects on the highs and lows of a recent trip to the US. Being stared at was a positive experience for once. A couple of disabled New Yorkers suggested the social model is to limited and claimed that disability is its own culture and the arts scene in Britain needs to recognise it as such. 

Sadly two more campaigners died recently. We take a moment to remember the contributions made by Mike Oliver a grandee of the disability movement and Jane Nokes less well known but who made a significant difference.

Click here for the Itunes link https://apple.co/2AvKoe8or here http://bit.ly/2WcMElTfor the Audioboom version  If you have any comments, feedback or suggestions, please email us at philandsimonshow@gmail.com. We hope you enjoy it.

You can download the transcript by clicking this anywhere on this sentence.

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The Generation Game

The Generation Game

How often do you hear, ‘what do the young people want?’ Perhaps not often enough. Certainly not as often as ‘how things have changed since my day!’ 

We wanted to hear from the next generation so we invited the multi-talented Abbi Brown on to our show. She works for the ad agency behind the now famous Malteser adverts on Channel 4.

With Abbi we explore whether you can make more of a difference from the inside or outside, who her (disabled) role models were when she was growing up and does she think there’s a disability movement these days. Indeed, what is activism these days, what are the next generation ‘fighting for’ if anything and does social media help or hinder? We also talk about using the bus and not thinking twice about it. 

Abbi has personal experience of disability with OI (brittle bones) deafness and mental health problems. 

You can follow Abbi on 

Twitter @AbbiSigns 

Instagram abbisigns  

YouTube  Ithinkmynameismoose